More Than Just Hearing Aids

What’s your favorite sound?

Happy First Sunday of Better Hearing Month! We hope that everyone is able to get out and enjoy the beautiful weekend that we are having.

Since we’re posting once-per-day in May to celebrate Better Hearing Month, we’re able to revisit some of our favorites!

I couldn’t help sharing one of my favorite hearing related campaigns. This one was brought to us by Unitron.

[av_video src=’https://youtu.be/qtuE1VhK1PM’ format=’16-9′ width=’16’ height=’9′]

So we ask you, What’s Your Favorite Sound?

Paige’s favorite sound is her happy dogs greeting her when she arrives home. (And who doesn’t LOVE that sound?)

Bernice’s favorite sounds of the beach, the waves rolling in and out, but probably not the sound of the seagulls.

& Melissa loves the sound of snow falling. (But we don’t want to think of snow in May!)

Thinking about all of the different sounds that we love makes us think of how many sounds those with hearing loss are missing out on – don’t forget to commit one hour in the May to improved hearing. One hour with our Audiologists can change your life!

Call to arrange an appointment with us! Just one hour! (519) 961-9285

 

What is an Audiologist?

Continuing with our post-per-day vow through the month of May for Better Hearing Month, we decided to tell you who and what we are! We’re Audiologists!

At The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic, we are happy to have two Doctors of Audiology, Audiologists – Paige Pierozynski & Bernice McKenzie – to help you with your hearing & balance needs.

An Audiologist is a healthcare practitioner with a special interest in your ears. Our expertise includes the prevention, identification, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of auditory and balance disorders; and provide care to all age groups from infants to the elderly.

We like how this Audiologist explains the differences between practitioners that you may see about your ears or hearing and why you should choose an Audiologist.

If you or someone you know has a problem with their hearing, experiences tinnitus, vertigo or imbalance – we’d be glad to offer our services and experience to you. We are open Monday through Friday, and are independently and locally owned.

Please call (519) 961-9285 to schedule an appointment for your hearing or balance with our Audiologists!

 

May is Better Hearing Month!

Who’s ready to kick off Better Hearing Month?!?

For the entire month of May we will be celebrating…US!  By us, we mean – Doctors of Audiology, Audiologists!

While that may sound a bit self-serving, celebrating US means focusing on what we can do for you!

Through daily blog posts for the month of May, we will show you all of the ways that we can help you, your family members, friends, and co-workers with improved hearing health.

Our main goal is to help you improve your quality of life through better hearing and balance. Your EARS connect you to the people you love and the activities you love to do – it is imperative that we celebrate this!

In the spirit of Us: Doctors of Audiology, we absolutely LOVE —–>  this video  <——  It shows one of the many reasons why we wanted to become Audiologists.

So cheers to us, and Better Hearing Month! #BHSM 

P.S. Best of luck to the #Essex73s taking on Port Hope tonight! We’re rooting for you! Bring home the Schmalz Cup!

 

Breaking Tinnitus News!

A huge advancement in the study of tinnitus was made recently as researchers were able to map the tinnitus pathways!

A 50 year old man with bilateral (both ears) tinnitus underwent two days of extensive brain mapping.

Hopefully this ground-breaking tinnitus advancement will lead to the evolution of medications or procedures to alleviate tinnitus in the near future!

Read the whole journal article here!

If you or someone you love suffers from tinnitus, there is help! The Doctors of Audiology at The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic have a special interest in tinnitus. Call us at (519) 961-9285 to arrange a Tinnitus Evaluation!

7 Signs That Your Spouse Has A Hearing Loss

Do you think your loved one has a hearing loss? This can be a sensitive issue for some couples.

Here are a few clues to look for as to whether or not your relationship might benefit from improved hearing!

The 7 Signs include:

1. Complaints about mumbling. Hearing loss isn’t just a lack of volume, its about lack of word understanding. If everyone around you sounds like the teacher from Charlie Brown, chances are you’re suffering from hearing loss. If it sounds like you’ve got cotton in your ears, you aren’t picking up the full range of sound – from high notes to low – making noise sound like mumbling to you.

2. Mixing up words. “You want me to eat a frog?” “No, Fred, I said, ‘See the fog’.”   When hearing starts to go, the brain may compensate for words not heard. Misunderstanding people can be embarrassing, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

3. TV is too loud. Are others complaining that the TV is shaking the windows? If this isn’t a sign of hearing loss, nothing is. This is a common complaint of those living with someone who has a hearing loss.

4. Trouble with background noise or conversation. Being a little lost in conversation isn’t always a sign of hearing loss. However, let’s say you’re at a work meeting or eating dinner with the family; when two or more people talk at the same time, do you have a hard time keeping up? People with hearing loss have a hard time masking out background noise.

5. Constantly asking for repetition, saying “What?” or “Pardon?” more than a couple of times a day. Just because you didn’t hear a mumbling co-worker from 10 feet away doesn’t mean you have a hearing loss. However, if “what?” or “huh” is the most commonly used word in your vocabulary, you aren’t getting the sound signals you need to process sound correctly.

6. Trouble communicating on the phone, or from a different room – when not face to face. When you have a hearing loss, the brain tries to fill in the information that is missing with your eyes: reading facial cues and gestures is not something that can be done on the telephone.

7. Withdrawing or avoiding social situations. If social events used to be fun but now they’re exhausting or frustrating, this is a sign of hearing loss – straining to hear conversations or focus on hearing and listening is hard on all our senses.

If you answered YES to any of these clues, your loved one will benefit from a hearing evaluation done by our Doctors of Audiology. A hearing evaluation is quick and painless and results are given immediately. Read more here.

Studies show that once a hearing loss is diagnosed it sometimes takes 7 years to do something about it! Imagine waiting 7 years to treat diagnosed high blood pressure or vision loss!

Call The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic today to arrange a hearing evaluation at (519) 961-9285, you’ll be glad you did!

April 2 is World Autism Awareness Day 2015

This April The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic is lighting it up blue for Autism Awareness! #LIUB

Susan Eichert from the Autism Treatment Network answers the question below in a recent article published on AustismSpeaks.org:

Our child has autism, will an ordinary hearing test work for him? Who should we see and what can we do?

Our professional view is much the same as Susan’s. Her advice is useful for parents of all children – she recommends seeing an Audiologist who has experience testing children behaviorally – that is, with having a child respond to words or beeps or interacting with sounds through play. Some children do not tolerate headphones, and that’s OK. At The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic we are able to test a child’s hearing using a sound field. We are also happy to have visual reinforcement audiometry in our arsenal to elicit valid responses for every developmental age – for both verbal and non-verbal children.

A reliable hearing test result for your child is something our Doctors of Audiology strive for! Call (519) 961-9285 to book your child’s hearing test appointment!

Susan’s full article can be found here:  Can Hearing Problems Contribute to Autism-Related Speech Delays?

 

 

Essex Free Press Article about our Tinnitus Lunch & Learn

Happy Thursday!  Hope everyone is staying dry and warm on this “spring” day.

Please see Sylene Argent’s article titled Clinic Shares Information about Tinnitus in the Essex Free Press this week. Sylene reported on our Tinnitus Lunch & Learn that we hosted on March 23, 2015.

If you or a loved one is suffering from tinnitus, or have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic at 519.961.9285

Happy Friday!

With March Break upon us, we wanted to take this opportunity to remind you that the silence of your child wearing headphones or earbuds while listen to music or video games is NOT always golden.

An iPod’s maximum volume is more than 10 times as loud as the recommended listening setting & the sensory damage caused by prolonged listening is irreversible.

With hearing loss on the rise in teens in the last decade, we urge you to implement some simple – but effective safe listening rules for your child.

1. Never allow listening through headphones for longer than 4 hours per day. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), being exposed to more than 85 decibels (about the level that teens listen to their music today) of sound for eight hours can damage your hearing.*

2. Provide your child with cool – but safe – listening gear. Such as these headphones which control the volume through filters which caps the output of sound.

3. Have your child’s hearing tested. If he or she listens to a lot of music or plays a lot of video games with headphones on, we recommend a hearing test every 2nd year. Call The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic at (519) 961-9285 today to have your child’s hearing tested!

Have a safe and fun March Break! We’ll keep our fingers crossed for nice weather!

____

*Read more HERE

 

 

Can Hearing Aids Help People With Tinnitus?

As we are leading up to our Tinnitus Lunch & Learn on Monday March 23, we thought we would try to shed a little bit of light on how hearing aids can help those who suffer with tinnitus.

Tinnitus is a ringing, buzzing or chirping sound, perceived when there is no external sound present. Research shows that aging, exposure to loud sounds, earwax accumulation and ear bone changes (otosclerosis) contribute to the cause of tinnitus.

Many factors affect a person’s tinnitus such as: anxiety, stress and blood pressure.  There are many studies show that of the 20% of the world’s population suffers from tinnitus & many also have a hearing loss.

Which bring us to the question: Can Hearing Aids Help People With Tinnitus?

The short answer is: YES!

Studies* show that of those who complain of hearing loss (from the most mild loss to the most severe) together with tinnitus, hearing aids in both ears alleviated tinnitus perception in 69% of users!

Can tinnitus be alleviated by Hearing Aids?

Why do they help? Hearing aids provide a diversion for our brains. They tell our brain “hear this instead” and those sounds which would be lost by our hearing loss now act to stimulate the areas that were previously the source of our tinnitus. Hearing aids also make our sound range much larger, giving us more things outside of ourselves to listen to. Hearing aids reduce anxiety caused by troubled communications and help reduce stress while also having the added benefit of an improved social life. Hearing aids reduce the fatigue brought upon us by always listening closely. Hearing aids can also be programmed to mask the tinnitus with a sound that is more pleasant than the tinnitus itself.

Our Doctors of Audiology can help you with your tinnitus.  Just because there is not a cure for tinnitus, it does not mean there is no hope/help.  At The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic we are able to perform tinnitus testing and provide treatment, counselling and management. Call (519) 961-9285 to book your appointment today!

Read More

Diabetics – Schedule Your Annual Hearing Test Today

Happy Wednesday!

We all know there are many causes of hearing loss; exposure to loud noise, aging, head trauma, etc. What you may not associate with hearing loss is DIABETES. Studies show that people who are diabetic – even pre-diabetic, were twice as likely to have a hearing loss. Considering there are 2.4 million Canadians who have been diagnosed diabetic, a visit to our Doctors of Audiology at The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic for an annual hearing test is a must!

If you or someone you love suffers from Diabetes, call 519.961.9285 today to arrange your diagnostic hearing assessment.

The full article can be found here -> http://www.healthyhearing.com/report/52369-Diabetics-twice-as-likely-to-have-hearing-loss

How your hearing loss affects your whole family

Many times when asked,  we hear that men are in our clinic at the prodding of their wife, and wives visit because their husbands or children asked them to come in.

Often, our patients don’t fully appreciate the affects their hearing loss has on the people that love them most, the frustration, the fatigue, the patience that is needed for better communication with their loved one.

This Family Day, do your family a favor and come on in for a Hearing Test. If your loved one is having trouble hearing, give them our number.

We’d love to have the opportunity to help.

Don’t waste another minute NOT hearing your loved ones!

We love how this video talks about the different ways a hearing loss can affect the way you communicate with your close family:  http://www.today.com/video/today/38932880#38932880

 

10 Signs YOU May Have Hearing Loss

Hello! We hope this entry finds you warm and well!

We got to talking about how Melissa’s Grandmother says she mumbles, and Paige’s Dad commonly mishears parts of a conversation.

The article below illustrates the 10 signs that you may have  a hearing loss. How many apply to you? To your loved ones? If YES was answered to any of these, then you should call us at (519) 961-9285 to schedule a comprehensive hearing assessment!

Click  here  for the article.

 

Hearing Aids May Improve Balance

Hearing Aids May Improve Balance
by Julia Evangelou Strait

Timothy Hullar, MD, (right) and medical student Miranda Colletta help patient Audrey Miller prepare for a balance test. Older adults with hearing loss appeared to perform better on balance tests with both hearing aids on, according to Hullar’s research. Credit: Robert Boston

Enhancing hearing appears to improve balance in older adults with hearing loss, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Patients with hearing aids in both ears performed better on standard balance tests when their hearing aids were turned on compared with when they were off.

The small study, which appears in the journal The Laryngoscope, involved only 14 people ages 65 to 91 but is the first to demonstrate that sound information, separate from the balance system of the inner ear, contributes to maintaining the body’s stability. The study lends support to the idea that improving hearing through hearing aids or cochlear implants may help reduce the risk of falls in older people.

“We don’t think it’s just that wearing hearing aids makes the person more alert,” said senior author Timothy E. Hullar, MD, professor of otolaryngology at the School of Medicine. “The participants appeared to be using the sound information coming through their hearing aids as auditory reference points or landmarks to help maintain balance. It’s a bit like using your eyes to tell where you are in space. If we turn out the lights, people sway a little bit—more than they would if they could see. This study suggests that opening your ears also gives you information about balance.”
All participants served as their own controls, performing the balance tests with and without their hearing aids turned on. Since the researchers were interested in examining the effect of hearing, all tests were conducted in the presence of a sound source producing white noise, similar to the sound of radio static.
In one test, subjects’ eyes were covered as they stood with their feet together on a thick foam pad. In a second, more difficult task, patients stood on the floor with one foot in front of the other, heel to toe, also with no visual cues for balance. Patients were timed to see how long they could stand in these positions without moving their arms or feet, or requiring the aid of another person to maintain balance.
Several of the participants could maintain stability on the foam pad for at least 30 seconds (which is the considered normal), whether their hearing aids were on or not. But those having more difficulty with balance in this test performed better when their hearing aids were on. And the improvement in performance was even more apparent in the more challenging balance test.
“We wanted to see if we could detect an improvement even in people who did very well on the foam test,” Hullar said. “And we found, indeed, their balance improved during the harder test with their hearing aids on.”

For the foam pad test, patients maintained balance an average of 17 seconds with hearing aids off. With hearing aids on, this average increased to almost 26 seconds. And in the more difficult heel-to-toe test, patients remained stable an average of 5 seconds with hearing aids off. With them on, this time increased to an average of 10 seconds. Even with the small number of patients in the trial, both time differences were statistically significant.
Although patients could tell whether their hearing aids were on or off, the researchers randomized the order of the conditions in which each patient performed these tests, so that some performed the tests with hearing aids on first and some started with them off.
Hullar pointed out that many of the study patients did not report being consciously aware that they had performed better on these tests when their hearing aids were working. But he said he has heard anecdotal evidence that some people notice a difference.
“Many of my patients say their balance is better when they’re wearing hearing aids or cochlear implants,” Hullar said. “We wanted to find out if improved hearing really has a measurable effect on balance. And the metric that we use—how many seconds can you stand on a piece of foam—has a well-documented relationship to risk of falling.
“This is a small study,” Hullar added. “Obviously it needs to be repeated in a much larger study, and we’re seeking funding to do that.”

More information: “The effect of hearing aids on postural stability.” Laryngoscope. 2014 Oct 24. DOI: 10.1002/lary.24974. [Epub ahead of print] Journal reference: Laryngoscope
Provided by Washington University in St. Louis

 

 

Help Us Help Essex Families!

“Maybe Christmas, he thought… doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas, perhaps… means a little bit more!”
~Dr. Seuss

In the spirit of the Christmas season, The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic is happy to partner with the Essex Area Food Bank to help local families.

From now until December 23, 2014, we are accepting your kind donations of canned foods and/or new children’s toys to donate to the Essex Area Food Bank.

To show our gratitude for your contributions, we are pleased to offer a complimentary hearing screening or hearing aid cleaning if you have existing hearing aids.

Please contact 519.961.9285 to schedule your screening or cleaning today!

Hear for the Holidays!

Paige

Christmas Promo