Three statements that indicate you need a hearing test.

This month’s blog is going to be a little different! I have broken down some of the most common statements that individuals with untreated hearing loss report. Often when someone is suffering from untreated hearing loss they state that they don’t know if the problem is due to hearing loss, their spouses’ voices, or their environment.

 

Statement 1:

 

Eventually, I got tired of asking and just smiled politely.

 

I think we have all experienced this once or twice. The background noise in the restaurant is so overpowering that it’s hard to concentrate on the words being spoken. After asking to repeat once, then twice, it’s common for some people to give up on the conversation and just smile politely. 

 

This patient knew that they needed help because it wasn’t only happening in restaurants. It was also happening at home, in grocery stores, and at work in quiet settings. 

 

When situations like this occur, those with hearing loss will stop participating in conversations due to the level of difficulty and frustration. It is not uncommon for individuals to blame the other person for mumbling or talking to quietly. 

 

Statement 2:

It’s frustrating because I have to continuously ask her what she’s saying. So, I eventually just stop doing it and I just guess, which usually results in embarrassment or an argument.

 

Untreated hearing loss may result in embarrassment? Yes, you read that right! In an effort to continue the natural flow of the conversation many of my patients have confessed to me that they guessed what the other person was telling them, just so they didn’t have to ask for clarification. 

 

For example, “It’s windy today” may sound a lot like “It’s Wednesday today.”

 

It is not uncommon for patients with untreated hearing loss to also report that they constantly bicker with their loved ones because they thought they heard one thing but really their family was trying to tell them something else. This is one example how anxiety, depression, and social isolation can start to creep into the lives of those suffering from untreated hearing loss.

 

Statement 3:

 

Eventually we just stopped going. It’s not interesting anymore. I don’t enjoy it.

 

This one, personally, is hard for me to hear. I’ve had patients who quit attending things like bible study or choir rehearsal because they found it more frustrating than enjoyable due to their untreated hearing loss.

 

You may ask yourself, why do people wait so long to get treated or even tested for hearing loss? The reality is it goes unnoticed, sometimes for years. It’s usually their loved one or friends who notice the difficulty in communication their untreated hearing loss is causing. This is because the most common type of hearing loss is only in the high frequencies, leaving the low frequencies normal. So, for most people if their low frequencies sound normal they will pass the blame to others or the environment they are in.

 

If these statements above sound similar please contact us for more information. The first step is to have a routine hearing evaluation. We pride ourselves on counseling our patients regarding their hearing evaluation in a way that is easy to understand in a pressure free environment.

 

Bernice McKenzie is an approved Dr.CliffAud provider

We’re please to announce that Bernice McKenzie is part of the DrCliffAud Approved Provider Network!!

If you’ve researched hearing aids during the last few year’s you’ve most likely seen videos posted by Dr. Cliff Olson on his youtube channel. If it is ear related, he probably has a video talking about it. You can check out his youtube channel by clicking here.

2019 Hear For The Holidays!

 

Do you know someone who’s life would be improved by improved hearing? WE WANT TO KNOW!

The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic and Amherstburg Audiology & Hearing Aids are in search of members of our communities (Essex, Amherstburg and LaSalle) who’s hearing impairment is holding them back – so we can gift them US! One lucky winner from each clinic will receive a set of hearing aids and the gift of our services for 3 years.

Simply click the gift below and fill out our short online form.

All applicants must make themselves available for an audiometric evaluation. Entries will be received until November 29, 2019 at 11:59pm, so that we can have some time to have our winners hearing by the holiday! If you have questions, please feel free to contact us any time!

CLICK HERE TO ENTER!

Buying Hearing Aids from independent clinic versus a big box store

I will start off by saying that I will always recommend an independent private practice audiologist over a chain. Part of the reason being because I am in private practice. There are of course other reasons:

(1) Locally owned and operated: we support local charities, events, sports teams. Our small audiology clinics are the ones supporting events in Amherstburg, Essex,  LaSalle, Harrow and McGregor.

(2) Not directly, or indirectly, owned by a hearing aid manufacturer. You will always be prescribed that is best for you, not what is best for our shareholders in Europe.

(3) You are guaranteed to see a regulated health care provider. Many chins do not have audiologists on staff, therefore may not be seeing an audiologist and may not realize it. Many audiologists in our region are in private practice. If you live in Amherstburg, LaSalle, Harrow or McGregor and want to be seen by a regulated hearing healthcare professional, then you need to visit a private practice.

I do realize that there is a reason why you would want to buy from a chain. The only real reason I can think of is that you are planning on moving in the near future and want to deal with a company that has a location near your new home. You probably thought I was going to suggest that price would be a reason to buy from a chain. Unfortunately, that is not the case. Hearing aids are regulated medical devices, so there really isn’t a price difference between clinics. If you believe you will get a deal at a chain, book an appointment with an independent audiology clinic to see what they can offer.  You may be surprised that the independent private practice may offer a better deal than the faceless hearing aid chain.

Tinnitus

Tinnitus is the name given to the sensation of noises in the head and or ears. It is present when there is no external corresponding source. Patients report that it sounds like high pitched hissing, sizzling, ringing, buzzing, chirping, clicking, rushing, booming, roaring or even a pulsating or thumping sound.

Tinnitus can begin at any age. Although it does not mean that you have hearing loss, many people with hearing loss complain about tinnitus. According to the Tinnitus Association of Canada, there are more than 360,000 Canadians that suffer from this condition. Within that group, 150,000 report that these noises seriously impair their enjoyment of life.

The most common causes of tinnitus are a blow to the head, infection, noise exposure, whiplash injury; any kind of emotional or physical stress, or shock.

Who can help?

An Otolaryngologist (Ear, Nose and Throat) surgeon may exam you to detect conditions such as an acoustic neuroma, or otosclerosis, that the presence of tinnitus may suggest.

An Audiologist can test your hearing to determine whether the tinnitus might be eased by a hearing aid, a masker, or a combination of the two. There are a handful of audiologists that are qualified as counselors in Tinnitus Retraining Therapy. Doctor of Audiology Bernice A. McKenzie is proud to be one of those audiologists.

CONTACT US TODAY TO ARRANGE A TINNITUS EVALUATION…TOLL FREE 855.730.1030

For more information on tinnitus, please visit the websites for the Canadian Tinnitus Foundation, The American Tinnitus Association or the British Tinnitus Association.

For information about tinnitus management, please visit the website for the Tinnitus Practitioners Association.

My family doctor would know if I had a hearing loss

If you suspect that a loved one has a hearing loss, do not assume that the family physician will let you know. Less than 12% of physicians refer their patients to audiology. Physicians do not notice hearing loss because they typically see their patients in an ideal listening situation (small quiet room with no background noise).

If you believe that your loved one has a hearing loss, do not wait for the family physician to recommend a hearing test. You do not need a referral to see an audiologist, we are like dentists, you just need to call and make an appointment. Our clinic has been serving the residents of Amherstburg, LaSalle, McGregor, Essex, Harrow and Windsor since 2010.

I Think I’ll Wait Until My Hearing Gets Really Bad

“I Think I’ll Wait Until My Hearing Gets Really Bad”
Laurie Bornstein, MS, CCC/A
Executive Hearing LLC

What is your reason to postpone an investment in better hearing? While cost may certainly be a concern, it has also been shown that even when hearing aids are free, many still balk at wearing them. What’s worse is when physicians tell their patients that they are “too young” to wear hearing aids, or “not bad enough yet,” or that “hearing aids only make things louder.”

Physicians who are not Ear, Nose and Throat specialists get very little education about hearing in medical school. Even ENTs who are quite knowledgeable about ears are seldom educated about hearing aids, but because they are medical doctors, patients listen to them and accept as fact statements that might only be opinions. Hearing aid technology changes so frequently that audiologists can barely keep up, but that’s precisely what makes audiology a specialty that requires several years of schooling and constant updating!

When your physician (or anyone!) tells you to skip getting hearing aids for now, ask if s/he knows of a medical or surgical intervention that will make you hear better or make your tinnitus subside. If the answer is no, then get out of there and head to an audiologist for another opinion.

If you have trouble hearing – even “sometimes” – please don’t postpone taking care of it. Today’s hearing solutions range from simple amplifiers that are useful for those who truly might not benefit much from “real” hearing aids, yet report some difficulties, to high-tech devices that will even interact with some electronic devices in the home.
Many people don’t realize how much they miss and how much added stress and fatigue results from straining to hear. Life is not only safer and experiences richer when one can hear, people report having energy that they thought was only available to the young.

Now that there has been shown to be a relationship between untreated hearing loss and early onset of dementia, it is more important than ever to retain your hearing as long as possible. If that means wearing hearing aids, wear them proudly in the realization that you are taking care of yourself so that you can interact fully for as long as you walk this earth. Friends and loved ones are counting on you!

Sudden Hearing Loss

A few times a year I will get a phone call from a patients wanting to be seen right away because they woke up and could not hear out of one ear. Sometimes these people will complain about tinnitus, dizziness or a plugged up feeling. Sometimes the only symptom is hearing loss.

Sudden hearing loss is something you want to get checked right away. Here are some steps for you to follow:

(1) You will want to have your ears checked for wax by either your local independent audiologist, your family physician or nurse practitioner.

(2) If wax is not the culprit, you will want a full audiometric evaluation performed by an audiologist.

(3) Your audiologist will determine the degree and type of hearing loss that you have and then recommend the appropriate next steps. You may have to see an Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon (Otolaryngologist), and having a hearing test will help the audiologist come up with recommendations.

 If you woke up with decreased vision you would book an eye exam right away. Do not ignore sudden hearing loss, book a test with our local independent audiologist. Residents of Amherstburg, Harrow, LaSalle, McGregor, Essex and Windsor can call our office to be tested by our Doctor of Audiology.

It’s pretty clear. No one cares quite like Dad cares.

We’re so excited to be able to share the gift of hearing with your Dad this year!

Enter to win a prize for Dad that goes beyond just a special day. One winner will be chosen from all eligible entrants to receive one set of (2) hearing aids along with batteries & our caring services for 3 years at no cost to him!

To enter, leave a photo with your fatherly figure – dad, grandad, or dad in law in the comments below the video on our Facebook page, and book a hearing test for both you and Dad together online. Its that simple –but you must do both! (You’ll thank us later for the souvenir photo!)

Hurry though, we need your Dad’s picture by Monday June 18 at 11:59pm to be eligible.

Eligible entrants will have a demonstrated hearing loss requiring amplification and be ADP eligible at the time of fitting. Entrants agree to use of their likeness for advertisement purposes and follow up questionnaires must be completed.

Understanding Hearing Loss

A hearing loss, or hearing impairment, is when your hearing is not within the normal predisposed range. In order to understand this, it might be helpful to understand a hearing test and what it measures.

An audiogram is a graphical representation of what you hear. There will be two axes: one represents the different frequencies tested in Hertz (Hz) and the other represents the level/volume in decibel (dB). Based on the test results, we will plot the softest sound that you hear at each specific frequency, which is called the threshold. Responses obtained from the right ear are plotted by using an “O” while responses obtained from the left ear are plotted with an “X”. To make sure you understand this concept, let us look at the audiogram below. The threshold for the right ear at 250Hz is 25dB, at 2000Hz it is 40dB and at 8000Hz it is 65dB.

Normal hearing is 0dB for all the frequencies, but we take the range between -10dB to 25dB as an acceptable one. That means that any threshold where the number is 25dB or greater is considered to be a hearing loss.

To give you an idea of how loud things are, below is a list of various sounds and their corresponding decibel levels.

audiogram0 dB – Threshold of hearing
20dB – Rustling Leaves
30 dB – Quiet Whisper 3 feet away
40dB – A Quiet Home
50dB – A Quiet Street
60dB – Normal Conversation
70dB – Inside a Car
75dB – Loud Singing 3 feet away
80dB – A Car 25 feet away
88dB – Motorcycle 30 feet away
90dB – Foodblender 3 feet away
94dB – A Subway (inside)
100dB – A Diesel Truck 30 feet away
107dB – A Power Mower 3 feet away
115dB – Pneumatic Riveter 3 feet away
117dB – A Cain Saw 3 feet away
130dB – A Jet Plane 100 feet away

“Throughout the years, I have had many patients tell me that their hearing is normal for their age. There are no age specific values for normal hearing. You either have hearing loss or you don’t.”
Bernice A. McKenzie, Au.D.

A blood test for your hearing loss or vertigo?

I recently came across this article: Detecting Hearing Loss, Vertigo Via Blood Tests

University of Connecticut Health physician-scientist Dr. Kourosh Parham has discovered two ear proteins that circulate in the blood whose presence and quantities correlate with ear disorders. As a result he has developed the first blood test to identify ear disorders. 

Does that mean the end of hearing tests? NOPE! This means that one day your Doctor may be able to accurately run a blood test that shows you have an ear disorder to expedite a referral to an audiologist or otolaryngologist!

So while this isn’t the end of sitting in a sound proof booth, this is scientific progress!

 

 

If Kate Spade and Tom Ford made hearing aids…

Would you want them? Would you wear them?

I’m typing this blog post looking through my Coach glasses in my comfy Michael Kors sweater feeling a little… miffed. I think miffed is the right word. (Miffed: put into an irritable mood, especially by an offending incident.) I feel like what I get up and do every day, what I love to do – isn’t cool.  

Welcome to 2016. A profound era where everything and everyone is trying to make us feel inadequate at every turn. Growing up in the 80’s and 90’s we had fads of course, i.e. Starter Jackets, Reebok Pump and HyperColor Shirts. But we didn’t have The Kardashian’s telling us what’s cool and what’s not.

This got me thinking. If Tom Ford had his own brand of hearing aid, would it be cool to have them? Would hearing aids becomes sexy then?

If Apple created an iHear hearing aid, would you sleep outside my office to be the first of your friends to have one?

I get this profound feeling that YES! People would actually want to do something about their hearing loss and wear a hearing aid. I wouldn’t have to try to convince you that your quality of life would be improved significantly by hearing your loved ones loud and clear. You would want to wear hearing aids because its cool. Its trendy. Your friend Jill already has them and wears them at the gym, and they sync with her iPhone and let her know her heart rate.

Those with hearing loss would seek them out and that those without hearing loss would want to wear them anyways (just like its fun, personal and stylish to wear designer eyeglass frames without a need for vision correction).

Many people are under the understanding that hearing aids are the big squealing ugly beige machines that their grandpa keeps in the kitchen junk drawer. Hearing aids may just be the last ‘un-cool’ piece of technology out there. And there’s no reason for that really. Hearing loss is something that happens to a great many people, many of whom are infants, children, teenagers, young adults. Yet when you think of how hearing aids are perceived in our society, you think of Alma in the Sister Act movies (a la ‘Hey Alma! Check your battery!’). Hearing aids are a pain in the butt. I mean, you actually have to put them in your ears and that’s such a hassle. Ugh, the tiny batteries need to be changed once a week – who has time to do that when you also have to plug in your phone every night?

A quick Google search on simply ‘Hearing Aids’ brings us the webpages of AARP and The Mayo Clinic. Do another Google Search for eyeglasses and this comes up:

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See what I’m talking about there? Vision correction is stylish, fashionable. There is no perceived stigma associated with vision correction anymore like Steve Urkel on Family Matters. It’s personalized. Hearing correction? It’s certainly not perceived that way – YET! The numbers are kind of astounding: 60% of the population has a treatable vision loss, while 20% of the population admits freely to hearing difficulty.

However, there’s another stat in here that you can’t see: The average person who has a hearing loss waits 7 years to treat it, i.e. those with hearing loss who are in denial and pretending to hear perfectly well are not a part of the aforementioned 20%. Grandpa, that’s you. I don’t mumble at all!

Again, the question begs… what do eyeglasses have that hearing aids do not? Why do Oakley, Nike and Calvin Klein not have a piece of the hearing aid pie? (Other than because there’s a technology involved, and an adjustment period to hearing aids at the brain level)

Because (despite it being very untrue) hearing aids are for old people and no one wants to accept that they are aging. Hearing aids are a nuisance. Hearing aids are ugly. Hearing loss carries a ‘less than’ stigma. No one deemed ‘cool’ by society wears hearing aids and if they do, they are beige and blend in, because – for shame! other people should see them!

Well, hear this! A Denmark based company with a Canadian presence called GN Resound is going where no hearing aid manufacturer has gone before. They’re trying to cap into that ‘allure’ of technology with the Linx²… they work with your iPhone and have an app, they are nano-coated and water resistant. The product is cool and hip and stylish. Except it isn’t. Because its still taking people 7 years to admit to their hearing loss and come in to see for themselves how the technology has improved.

Now, all that Resound needs is a George Clooney walking the red carpet with an Ocean Blue (see what I did there?) piece of technology sitting snugly behind his ears for all the word to see. For an Anderson Cooper to declare the Linx² the greatest in all the land. For a Taylor Swift to state unequivocally that hers were the inspiration for writing a new hit song.

Until that happens: You don’t want hearing aids. Heck – you don’t need them. You’re perfectly fine with society telling you that hearing loss makes you look old, feel old, that you lack in something because your hearing isn’t perfect. You don’t need to see the audiologist because you already know what he or she will say and you don’t think hearing aids can help you.

May is Better Speech & Hearing Month. Don’t be the statistic who waits 7 years to look seek improved communication with your loved ones. Come visit our Doctors of Audiology and finally turn that TV down. Imagine all the experiences that you’ll miss out on in those 7 years. It’s a long time. You wouldn’t go 7 years without seeing your loved ones properly, would you?

Why choose Audiology?

[av_video src=’https://youtu.be/6dBeDTBnHw0′ format=’16-9′ width=’16’ height=’9′]

May is “Better Speech & Hearing Month”. Throughout the month of May, audiologists put in extra effort to highlight the importance of hearing health within our communities. Every year, thousands of professionals involved with the treatment of speech, language and hearing disorders come together to participate in a public awareness campaign that encourages early detection and prevention of communication disorders, and seeks to increase the public’s sensitivity to the challenges faced by individuals experiencing them.

Have questions about your hearing or speech? We’re happy to answer any questions or concerns that you may have about your hearing. Contact us today to arrange a consultation or your annual hearing test with our Doctor of Audiology! (519) 961-9285.

Hearing is important, but is it THAT important?

Hearing empowers us and enriches our lives. Hearing enables us to socialize, work, interact, communicate and even relax. Good hearing also helps to keep us safe, warning us of potential danger or alerting us to someone else’s distress.

Hearing is essential for us to be able to live and participate in life more fully. Problems with our hearing may lead to feelings of isolation and even depression. Our hearing provides us with an enormous source of information, some of it obvious and some we barely notice but when combined, this information forms the bridge between the world and how we interact with it.

Hearing helps us lead our everyday lives without limitations.

Hearing is important…

… at work

  • Participating in group meetings.
  • Talking on the telephone.
  • Following a conversation in a busy office.

… at social occasions

  • Chatting to friends.
  • Participating in dinner conversation at a restaurant.
  • Interacting with grandchildren.
  • Talking on the telephone.
  • Watching TV together with others.

… for our own safety

  • When walking near busy roads.
  • To be able to hear sounds that alert us to danger like sirens and other traffic signals.
  • So we can be alert to a cry for help.

… when we learn

  • Allowing us to maintain a high level of concentration with little effort.
  • So we are able to communicate with instructors.
  • So we are able to register information accurately.

Read more: here

Hearing Loss: No, it’s not just you.

You’re experiencing hearing loss, and you assume it’s just you. But it’s not just you. One out of every nine of us have hearing loss, that’s nearly 4 million Canadians.

That’s important for you to know if you are experiencing hearing issues. It can help to know that you are not alone. 

Hearing loss occurs naturally as people get older, but it’s not just seniors who are affected. Changes to your hearing can begin to occur for many when they reach their 20s, 30s and 40s, and while approximately 30 percent of people over the age of 65 have some degree of hearing loss, more than 65 percent of those who experience hearing loss do so before retirement age.

About 15 percent of Baby Boomers (ages 41-59) and 7 percent of Generation Xers (ages 29-34) already have significant issues with their hearing.

Because hearing loss occurs gradually, its effects are sometimes not immediately obvious, especially when it comes to recognizing a change in one’s own hearing. Often it’s a friend, family member or co-worker that points it out, and even then it can be hard to believe that it’s happening to you.

Taking care of your hearing is your responsibility. It’s up to you to be alert to the signs and have your hearing checked if you suspect that your hearing may be changing.

These signs may include: Turning the TV louder, requiring others to repeat themselves, thinking that others are mumbling, having ringing (tinnitus) in your ears, feeling tired or exhausted after strenuous listening activities or have a family history of hearing loss.

For a limited time, there is no cost to have your hearing assessed by our Doctors of Audiology if you are an adult aged 18+. We simply ask for a donation to the Essex Area Food Bank. A hearing assessment takes but an hour and will help alleviate your concerns. We are able to arrange an appointment for you Monday through Friday, from 9am until 5pm. Call today to arrange your appointment! (519) 961-9285.

Vertigo and “Ear Crystals”

We have a large number of patients who call us to inform us that their Doctor has told them that they have “Ear Crystals” and that they should come to see us; that we may be able to help them. Everyone has ear crystals, but when they migrate or move away from where they are supposed to be, most often, YES, we can help them! But how?

Trouble with “Ear Crystals’ is another way of describing BPPV, Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Benign: the condition almost always goes away with proper treatment Paroxysmal: the condition may return causing vertigo without warning Positional: it is brought on by specific type of head movement Vertigo: the sensation is that of spinning that may be mild or violent.

These crystals normally lie in a gel layer inside the utricle in our vestibular systems. A common symptom of migrated crystals is that there is dizziness or vertigo when you wake up, nausea and vomiting. The vertigo may stop when the position of your head is held still. The common reasons that these crystals migrate can be: head injury, aging, or idiopathic (the cause is not known). Some studies show there may be a correlation between allergies and respiratory infections and BPPV.

Whatever the reason that caused those crystals to migrate, the treatment is same: Particle or crystal re-positioning – getting those crystals back into the utricle. Our Doctors of Audiology are well versed in this. We often hear that people have tried these maneuvers at home, without success – we do not recommend this, as if completed improperly may cause more harm than good.

So what should you expect of your appointment with us? Well, we always ask you to fill out a case history and those documents will be reviewed with the audiologist. Then a few very precise head and body maneuvers will determine if you could be helped by the crystal re-positioning. The entire appointment takes but 1 hour and symptoms may disappear entirely with one treatment.

If you are tired of feeling dizzy or imbalanced when changing positions, simply call us to arrange an appointment with the audiologist at The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic.

Startling Statistics About BPPV

At The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic, we understand how debilitating BPPV or  Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo can be.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common form of positional vertigo and is probably the most common disorder involving vertigo. It’s an affliction of the inner ear. In the most common clinical scenario, when the patient changes the position of the head, he or she feels that the room is spinning. The person may experience significant nausea as well.┘

According to The University of California, BPPV will affect nearly 40 percent of people over 40 at least once in their lifetime.

The good news about BPPV is that in most cases, it is entirely treatable.

The bad news about BPPV is that studies show, it can take an absurdly very long time from presentation of symptoms to treatment.

 

Two recent studies explored the time period from initial presentation of symptoms of BPPV to correct diagnosis. Fife and Fitzgerald report that in the United Kingdom, the mean wait time from initial presentation to correct diagnosis was 92 weeks. A more recent study out of China found the delay to be longer than 70 months.

We have witnessed this very same phenomenon in our practice, when people have seen multiple specialties and undergone several tests over the course of months and even years. Patients have altered their lives to accommodate their BPPV, changed their habits, disturbed their activities, family lives and working responsibilities. BPPV is easily diagnosed and easily treated.

In both studies mentioned above, the subjects were treated with Canalith repositioning (CRP) once the diagnosis of BPPV was made. In the Chinese study over 80% were successfully treated with one CRP, while the Fife and Fitzgerald study reports 85% were successfully treated.

Perhaps this is the most disturbing reality of these studies. 8/10 people who had suffered for years from Vertigo were cured of their BPPV in one treatment. Just one. 

At least 85% of cases had classical symptoms of BPPV and could have been easily identified by Primary Care Physicians at first referral, had they been trained to recognize and diagnose the condition.┌

It’s amazing to me that once someone is affected by BPPV and they tell their family and friends about it, they are shocked to realize how many people they know have experienced the very same thing! Further, they are shocked at just how easy it is to treat.

We are happy to test and manage your BPPV for you and your loved ones right in the heart of Essex County. If you have questions or concerns in regards to who we are and how we can help, please never hesitate to contact us. We are here to help!

Don’t be a statistic! 

Read More

Thank you Essex for your Support!

It’s Food Bank day at The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic!

THANK YOU Essex County for your support of our non-perishable food donations to The Essex Area Food Bank.

We had set a goal of 500lbs to collect for those in our community who are in need of our help, doing hearing tests in exchange for non-perishable food items. We are happy to report that we have SMASHED that goal with at least twice what we had hoped! You brought everything from noodles to beans, rice to corn meal and cereal and baby food.

Please call if you are in need of your annual hearing screening. For a limited time, our Doctors of Audiology will provide complimentary adult hearing screenings for a canned food donation. Call today to arrange your appointment at (519) 961-9285

New Physician Guidelines for Treating Children’s Ear Infections

The American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Family Physicians released their new treatment recommendations for children who suffer from Otitis Media with Effusion or OME (commonly known as ‘fluid’ or an ear infection).

New recommendations include

  • additional information on pneumatic otoscopy and tympanometry to improve diagnostic certainty;
  • expanded information on speech and language assessment for children with OME;
  • new recommendations for managing OME in children who fail a newborn hearing screen and for evaluating at-risk children;
  • a new recommendation against using topical intranasal steroids;
  • a new recommendation against adenoidectomy for a primary indication of OME in children under 4 years of age;
  • a new recommendation for assessing OME outcomes.

Clinicians should continue to avoid antibiotics and myringotomy (tube) surgery (under aged 4).

More information can be found here.